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Zombie Apocalypse: Bath Salts Becomes Most Searched Drug on the Internet After 'Zombie' Attacks

Bath salts are the new drug people are searching for on the Internet, since the “zombie apocalypse” attacks by the “Miami cannibal” last week. 

The synthetic drug reportedly produces “an extreme high of euphoria” and is comparable to amphetamines and cocaine.

An anonymous former explains the scary experience:

"(It) felt like I wanted to kill me or kill somebody else. It’s a horrible feeling of sketchiness, constantly looking over your shoulder or peeking out around your curtains or windows, hiding under the blankets."

The bath salts also prevent the person from sleeping for days, contributing to the dead-like appearance that has prompted comparisons between the drug users and mythical zombies.

"A person actually walked into the room and told me that he thought I was almost dead," the anonymous former user said; adding that the habit eventually sent him to the hospital and then to a detox unit which however hasn’t been able to free him of a feeling of “paranoia.”

While they are still awaiting toxicology reports confirming what potent drugs the face-eating “zombie” was on when he ripped the flesh off his victim, investigators suspect that Rudy Eugene, “The Miami Zombie,” had taken a synthetic substance dubbed “bath salts.”

The most frightening thing about the new narcotic epidemic is that these dangerous products aren’t sold by dealers on street corners, but instead are widely available at liquor stores, gas stations, and head shops and in order to know exactly what is in each package you have to seize them from the store and have them tested in a lab.

 Behind the deceptively innocent name is a highly dangerous drug that is sweeping across the country in an extreme epidemic that has caused such alarm that the Drug Enforcement Agency has introduced a temporary year-long ban of the three main chemicals in an effort to curb its production.

A 50-milligram packet of the white powdery bath salts reportedly sells for $25 to $50, and is also known by street names like “Ivory Wave,” “Vanilla Sky,” “Bliss,” and “Purple Rain.”

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