Arkansas Supreme Court Blocked Same-Sex Couples From Being Listed on Birth Certificates

Arkansas Supreme Court Blocked Same-Sex Couples From Being Listed on Birth Certificates
Source: AP
Source: AP

With a 5-2 vote, the Arkansas Supreme Court on Thursday granted a temporary stay on a ruling which allowed same-sex couples to appear on their children's birth certificates statewide.

The stay affects Pulaski County Circuit Judge Tim Fox's Dec. 1 ruling which gave three lesbian couples fighting the Arkansas Health Department Vital Statistics Bureau the right to be listed as the parents of their respective children. 

In his decision, Fox argued that withholding the names of same-sex parents from from their children's birth certificates is unconstitutional, citing the Supreme Court's June ruling that declared the ban on same-sex marriage unconstitutional.

"[The] decision affords the plaintiffs, as same-sex couples, the same constitutional rights with respect to the issuance of birth certificates and amended birth certificates as opposite-sex couples," Fox wrote in his Dec. 1 decision, Reuters reports.

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge filed an appeal against Fox's ruling, arguing that allowing same-sex couples on birth certificates was incompatible with existing state statutes, making the law ambiguous for birth registrars.

Arkansas Supreme Court declared on Thursday "the best course of action is to preserve the status quo with regard to the statutory provisions while we consider the circuit court's ruling," Reuters reports.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

MORE FROM

70% of Muslims still believe in the American dream, according to new Pew study

Despite high rates of discrimination, Muslims are optimistic about their lives in the United States.

Man with Nazi tattoos at Cleveland Indians game sparks outrage. The Indians’ mascot is still racist.

Swastikas are bad. So is Chief Wahoo.

Baton Rouge police chief resigns after a year of political turmoil over Alton Sterling shooting

Baton Rouge's mayor had campaigned on a promise to replace the city's police chief, in the wake of Alton Sterling's shooting death.

‘Whose Streets?’ film highlights Ferguson activists’ battle with the trauma of protests

Brittany Ferrell, an organizer of the Ferguson Uprising, says a new documentary about Black Lives Matter protests shows why activists should be more intentional about checking in on each other.

Minneapolis police chief resigns after fatal shooting of Australian woman

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau announced in a Facebook post that she is stepping aside.

Mentally ill prisoners in Louisiana forced to bark like dogs for food, lawsuit claims

Investigators came. Everyone was told not to speak to them.

70% of Muslims still believe in the American dream, according to new Pew study

Despite high rates of discrimination, Muslims are optimistic about their lives in the United States.

Man with Nazi tattoos at Cleveland Indians game sparks outrage. The Indians’ mascot is still racist.

Swastikas are bad. So is Chief Wahoo.

Baton Rouge police chief resigns after a year of political turmoil over Alton Sterling shooting

Baton Rouge's mayor had campaigned on a promise to replace the city's police chief, in the wake of Alton Sterling's shooting death.

‘Whose Streets?’ film highlights Ferguson activists’ battle with the trauma of protests

Brittany Ferrell, an organizer of the Ferguson Uprising, says a new documentary about Black Lives Matter protests shows why activists should be more intentional about checking in on each other.

Minneapolis police chief resigns after fatal shooting of Australian woman

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau announced in a Facebook post that she is stepping aside.

Mentally ill prisoners in Louisiana forced to bark like dogs for food, lawsuit claims

Investigators came. Everyone was told not to speak to them.