Hillary Clinton Accidentally Implies She Is Not the "Perfect" Choice for President

Source: AP
Source: AP

Susan Sarandon ruffled feathers Monday when she suggested she'd be open to a Donald Trump presidency should her nominee of choice, Bernie Sanders, fail to get the bid. 

But on Wednesday, in what Hillary Clinton might have hoped would be a sly retort to Sarandon, the Democratic presidential frontrunner may have accidentally taken herself down.

Read more: Bernie Supporter Susan Sarandon Said Trump Might Be What America Needs

"Some folks may have the luxury to hold out for 'the perfect,'" reads the tweet. "But a lot of Americans are hurting right now and they can't wait for that."

Not all of us, says Clinton, can afford to twiddle our thumbs, waiting until our ultimate dream candidate steps up to the plate. So... vote for her?

With less at stake and no need for safety nets, the country's elite (who count both Clinton and Sarandon among them) has the luxury of waiting out the speculated implosion of the political system, should Trump win — a point not lost on Twitter user Joseph Hughes. 

While Clinton's platform could most certainly be buttressed by this sentiment, the way she sold it didn't quite work. 

"Don't wait for perfection: Settle instead and vote for me." Who wouldn't want to get behind that?

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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