Soon, You'll Be Able to Pay for Stuff With Your Fingerprints in Japan

Soon, You'll Be Able to Pay for Stuff With Your Fingerprints in Japan
Source: Pixabay
Source: Pixabay

The Japanese government wants to use grimy fingerprints to learn what tourists buy. 

A new system in Japan will let registered tourists pay for products by placing two fingers on a tiny biometric reader, the Telegraph reported. The system will launch this summer in select stores and will automatically deduct taxes from purchases. 

Tourists will first register their fingerprints and credit card information in an airport or "convenient public location," according to the Telegraph. From there, they'll be able to use their fleshy digits as currency. The fingerprint system also lets foreign visitors use the biometric reader as an alternative to flashing their passports during hotel check-ins. 

This system will allow tourists to finger their way through 300 hot tourist spots in Japan, including souvenir shops, restaurants and hotels. 

But remember, convenience sometimes comes at a price. And in this case, the price you pay is your privacy. 

The government hopes to use the payment data from these fingerprint systems to analyze what tourists are spending money on during their travels. While the data will allegedly remain anonymous, it still gives the Japanese government information that could help make tourist traps even more ensnaring. 

The government claims the data will be used to "create effective tourism management policies," according to the Telegraph. They should probably also use it to tell shops when to load up on porcelain cat figurines, because Americans love that shit. 

The objective is to launch the fingerprint system throughout Japan in time for the 2020 Olympics, when hordes of souvenir-happy tourists descend upon the land. 

Travelers, go forth, and with the gentle touch of your phalanges, make it rain.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Melanie Ehrenkranz

Melanie is a writer covering technology and the future. She can be reached at melanie@mic.com.

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