Science Reveals the Difference Between Ideal, Perceived and Actual Penis Sizes

Science Reveals the Difference Between Ideal, Perceived and Actual Penis Sizes
Source: YouTube
Source: YouTube

Most people have their idea of how long the average, uh, eggplant emoji is and what constitutes the ideal eggplant emoji size. And then there's the reality of how big these penises — sorry, eggplants — actually are. 

DrEd, a British website that takes online prescription orders, did a study with more than 2,000 respondents in the United States and Europe to find out what some of those numbers look like. 

Read more: Transform Your Genitals Into Stuffed Animals With These Hand-Knit, Glorified Cock Socks

Shockingly, men thought both the average size and the ideal penis size were bigger than women did. For men, those numbers were 14.1 centimeters (5.5 inches) and 16.6 centimeters (6.5 inches) erect, respectively. 

Source: Mic/Creative Commons

Overall, women estimated the average erect penis size to be 13.8 centimeters (5.4 inches) and thought the perfect length would be 15.8 centimeters (6.2 inches) — the gap between perceived and ideal size is smaller for women than men.

Then on Monday, a study published in the British Journal of Urology International, which synthesized and analyzed the measurements of 15,521 different eggplant emojis, revealed the reality of penis size averages. 

The average flaccid penis, it turns out, is 9.16 centimeters (3.6 inches) long. And the average erect penis is 13.1 centimeters (5.2 inches). That's smaller than both men and women thought of the average penis. 

It's important to note the vast majority of subjects for the measurement study were Caucasian. Though that makes it more compatible with the DrEd study given most of their respondents were Caucasian, too. 

That's a wrap. Oh, and don't forget to use one.

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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