Here’s a Colossally Geeky (and Genius) Way to Ask Someone Out

Here’s a Colossally Geeky (and Genius) Way to Ask Someone Out
Source: AP
Source: AP

"How did you and Mom meet?"

"We met in the cloud."

The cloud may be a "fruit-bearing jackpot" for hackers, but it's also a honeypot for love.

Someone used Apple's AirDrop feature — which lets you share content with nearby users on an Apple device that is signed into iCloud and has the feature enabled — to ask someone out at a coffee shop, according to this Imgur post.

They seduced the unsuspecting Mac user by AirDropping a picture of a dog in sunglasses into a Word Doc with the message "Will u go out w/me." 

To which the recipient responded with an image of a cat in a hammock and the words "buy me a frappuccino I'm yours."

Source: Imgur

"THEY JUST CALLED OUT A FRAPPUCCINO FOR SWAG MONEY (that's the name of my computer on airdrop) IM GONNA CRY," according to the story on Imgur

This is enough romance fuel to forget that someone opened with "Do you wanna sit on my face?" on Tinder the night before. 

If you want to AirDrop into someone's heart, you can do so by tapping the content you want to share and then selecting the name of the nearby AirDrop user.

Note: Please do not ruin this handy feature for the rest of us by AirDropping a dick onto an unsuspecting user's MacBook. If you're not looking to be wooed over Wi-Fi, you can turn off AirDrop on your iPhone by swiping up to display your Control Center. From there, tap on AirDrop and then select "off." On your Mac, the AirDrop settings are in your Finder. Click "AirDrop" and "Allow me to be discovered by: No One."

Read more:
• 8 New Dating Terms That Are Totally the New "Ghosting"
• This College Student Snapchat Romance Is a Love Story for the Ages
• This Bar Came Up With a Cute Lil' Escape Plan for Women on Shitty Tinder Dates

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Melanie Ehrenkranz

Melanie is a writer covering technology and the future. She can be reached at melanie@mic.com.

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