Latina protester punks Eric Trump with "Latina contra Trump" t-shirt

Latina protester punks Eric Trump with "Latina contra Trump" t-shirt
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump has made fear of Latino infiltrators — supposed "bad hombres" such as "rapists" and murderers who wish to do U.S. citizens harm — a key highlight of his campaign.

So it's always good to see someone beat him at his own game. Sisters Annie and Ceci Cardelle, who live in Salisbury, North Carolina, heard Trump's son Eric Trump and his wife Lara would be visiting the state for a campaign function and decided to attend. Annie Cardelle wore a homemade t-shirt saying "Latina contra Trump," translating to "Latina against Trump."

Apparently, none of the Trump staffers spoke Spanish. Despite the presence of multiple screeners, the Cardelles were able to get a photo posing with the Trumps, the t-shirt in full view.

Trump's support among Latinos is on track to be the lowest for a Republican nominee in modern history, with one recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll finding Democrat Hillary Clinton holds a 67-17% lead over the real estate mogul among likely Latino voters.

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Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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