War on Thanksgiving: Native American Students Protest Holiday, Conservatives Freak Out

The American Indian Student Union (AISU) at the University of Virginia organized a potluck dinner over which to discuss the disparities between the happy-go-lucky myth of Thanksgiving and the reality of what went down between the pilgrims and the Native Americans. 

But, apparently, some people are greatly offended that a group of students would take time to remember the ugly history surrounding the beginning of this country, rather than pretending their ancestors were thrilled to welcome Europeans who stole from, raped, and murdered them.

“They think that doing events that put down what people understand to be modern Americans' realization of the American dream and American story is a way to raise awareness about the less glamorous parts of America’s history,” said Nicole Bailey, Executive-in-Chief of the conservative newspaper, The Virginia Advocate, in an interview with Campus Reform. “That’s frankly not true.” 

The Campus Reform article about the controversy surrounding the potluck garnered an alarming number of outraged comments, as if a potluck dinner might destroy the very fabric of America by offering an alternative to the traditional way to mark the holiday. 

Comments range from the ignorant acceptance of the whitewashed, nobody-got-hurt version of the Thanksgiving story:

 

To reverse-persecution, feeling attacked by people pointing out that they were attacked:

 

To accepting that Native Americans got totally screwed, but basically saying “so what?”:


 

To the outright racist, not to mention off topic:


With that much ignorance floating around on the Internet, it's no wonder that the student group felt the need to call attention to the rest of the story.

According to their website, the AISU strives to "increase awareness of the American Indian community on Grounds, holds cultural events relating to American Indians, and provides an organization where all students and community members can gather to explore Native American heritage and identity."

It doesn't seem to me that they're trying to destroy America or attack wholesome values, but then, what do I know, I'm just a crazy liberal.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Lilly O'Donnell

Lilly O'Donnell is a freelance writer, currently working on her first book.

MORE FROM

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

White Americans more likely to own guns, blacks more likely know someone who has been shot: study

New research reveals startling stats about the relationship African-Americans have with guns.