Jyoti Singh Pandey Death: Rapists Say They Are Not Guilty

Two of the five men accused of gang-raping and murdering 23-year-old physiotherapy student Jyoti Singh Pandey during a brutal and heinous attack in a moving Delhi bus will plead not guilty, according to The Globe and Mail.  

"They will plead not guilty to all charges," lawyer M.L. Sharma — who represents Mukesh Singh and Akshay Thakur — said. "Nothing has been proven yet," he added.

Singh is the brother of the bus driver on which the attack was perpetrated.  

Meanwhile, a sixth unidentified accused — who is 17-years-old — will be tried in a separate juvenile court.

According to the Globe, officials — who had previously told reporters they have DNA evidence — confirmed that Sharma had met the two defendants on Tuesday at the maximum-security prison where they are being held. Sharma reportedly said the defendants plan to challenge the DNA evidence. 

A closed-door hearing has been scheduled for January 10. 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

MORE FROM

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.