Gun Control March: Thousands Take to the Streets of Washington, Call For Assault Weapons Ban and End of NRA

A score of marchers holding signs with the name of gun violence victims and messages such as "Ban Assault Weapons Now," gathered in front of the Capitol on Saturday for a march on Washington for gun control.

The crowd, which stretched for about two blocks along Constitution Avenue were led by Mayor Vincent Gray and other officials on Saturday morning. The marchers held signs reading "Gun Control Now" and "Stop the NRA," among other messages. Other signs simply displayed the names of victims of gun violence.

The march was organized in response to the December elementary school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut, that killed 20 first-graders and six teachers ... and at least emotionally injured many more. About 100 residents of Newtown were expected at the march.

Marchers say that the thought of their own children were among the foremost factors in deciding to participate in this morning's march.

KaraMar Baekey of Norwalk, Conn., is one of them.

"I wanted to make sure this never happens at my kids' school or any other school," Baekey told CBS news. "It just can't happen again."

Molly Smith, the artistic director of Washington's Arena Stage, and her partner organized the march. While she's never organized a political march before, Smith said she was compelled to press for a change in the law.

The march organizers support President Barack Obama's call for a ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines as well as for universal background checks for gun sales. Organizers also want lawmakers to require gun safety training for all buyers of firearms.

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