Meet The Frat Bros Who Think Black Face Is "All Fun and Laughter"

An Asian-American fraternity from the University of California-Irvine have garnered a lot of (predictably) negative attention after they posted a parody of Justin Timberlake and Jay-Z's Black Tie video while one of them performed in blackface. 


They posted the video on Youtube with a disclaimer saying "No racism intended. All fun and laughter." 

That's weird because I don't see a lot of people laughing. 

After the media and the school's backlash, they posted an apology on their Facebook page. "The use of black face in the video is incredibly offensive as well as insensitive. This behavior is simply unacceptable and the individuals responsible for the video have already been reprimanded within the organization prior to the public outcry to which this formal apology is responding." their post reads. 

This comes two years after the University of California-Irvine (UCI) came under fire for serving Chicken and Waffles during Martin-Luther King Day. Ainaria Johnson from the UCI's Black Student's Union told The Daily Pilot that the fraternity's offensive video "isn’t the first, nor is it the last, example of racism that’s been shown on this campus."

Enraged that black face is still a thing we need to explain frat boys not to do? Let me know how you feel on Twitter: @feministabulous

Via: Rawstory

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Elizabeth Plank

Elizabeth is a Senior Correspondent at Mic and the host of Flip the Script.

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