Two People Steal The Same Bike, What Happens Next Is Something Black People Know All Too Well

If you saw someone stealing a bike, what would you do? You probably think you would stop them, regardless of their gender or race, right? Well according to a social experiment crafted by ABC News, your behavior would probably be guided by those very features. This shocking video produced in 2010 shows three different people getting very different reactions from bystanders when they attempt to steal the very same bike. 


Did that white woman just actually receive assistance, while the African American boy got the cops called on him? Although we would all like to believe we don't hold any racial stereotypes, this video shows just how insidious they can be. Anyone who says that race doesn't matter after seeing this, is either blind of completely deluded. Anyone who doesn't think racial profiling ever happens needs to see this video (and this one too). The Zimmerman trial has brought these issues to light and it's time we stop ignoring the the racism that plagues American society. The first step to ending it, is recognizing it.

How does this video make you feel? Exasperated? Angry? Furious? Let me know on Twitter: @feministabulous

Via Richard Hétu at La Presse.

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Elizabeth Plank

Elizabeth is a Senior Correspondent at Mic and the host of Flip the Script.

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