Marijuana Legalization: Poll Shows Majority Of Americans Support Pot Legalization, Finally

Marijuana Legalization: Poll Shows Majority Of Americans Support Pot Legalization, Finally

It seems that the U.S. is finally mature enough to admit that pot was never the youth-destroying menace it was once considered to be. A new Gallup poll has revealed that, for the first time, a decided majority of Americans approve of the legalization of marijuana.

Legalization has steadily been gaining support since Gallup began polling on the question in 1969, when only 12% of Americans supported legalizing dank kush, and 84% opposed.  


The change in attitude comes while only 38% of Americans admit to having toked some chronic, a number up from 4% in 1969, but equal to counts from the mid-80s. (Either parents are uncomfortable owning up to the lost years of their early 20s, or today's extra strong weed has been making them forget.) 

The poll comes on the heels of marijuana reform's recent electoral successes in Washington and Colorado, where it's now legal to possess and use weed for recreational purposes. Attorney General Eric Holder recently announced that the U.S. Department of Justice will stop imposing mandatory minimum offenses for non-violent drug offenders.

If we're going to be honest, sweet cheeba is really only a gateway drug to Domino's pizza. Perhaps this is the scourge we should have been fighting all along. 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Nina Ippolito

Nina Ippolito is a freelance writer and editor. Now that she's finally learned to drive, she's trying to master the other skills she missed out on by growing up in New York City: swimming, shooting, and horseback riding. Just not at the same time. Yet.

MORE FROM

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

While You Weren’t Looking: 5 stories from the week not birthed out of Trump’s wild Oval Office chat

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into his pardoning power. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

While You Weren’t Looking: 5 stories from the week not birthed out of Trump’s wild Oval Office chat

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into his pardoning power. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?