There's Been Another Ebola Diagnosis in Texas

Source: AP
Source: AP

The news: A health care worker who treated Thomas E. Duncan, the first Ebola patient in the U.S., has now tested positive for the disease, hospital officials announced Sunday.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will perform confirmatory tests later Sunday, NBC News reported. If they also turn up a positive diagnosis, the worker would become the first case to be transmitted or contracted in America. 

CNN reported that the patient is a female nurse. In a press conference Sunday, Texas Health Resources chief clinical officer Dan Varga said that she was in direct contact with Duncan during his second visit to the hospital; however, she was wearing CDC-approved protective gear, including a gown, gloves, mask and a shield. Varga added that she's in stable condition. 

In a press conference in Atlanta, CDC director Tom Frieden briefed reporters on the situation. 

"We are deeply concerned by the news," he said. "At some point there was a breach in protocol, and that breach in protocol resulted in this infection." 

According to Frieden, the patient became aware of symptoms Friday and then underwent testing. He noted that the level of virus in her system was "low." 

He mentioned the possibility of additional cases of Ebola emerging in the coming days, coming primarily from health care workers who cared for Duncan. However, he stressed that there is "no risk to people outside of that circle of healthcare workers, or the 48 people who had contact with Duncan." 

Source: LM Otero/AP

This second case comes on the heels of several Ebola scares across the United States. A Brooklyn teen was hospitalized Friday after exhibiting "suspicious" symptoms, but the New York Daily News reports that he has been cleared. Additionally, a flight out of John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York was grounded after a passenger vomited in-flight, and a woman in Nashville was also given a negative diagnosis after being admitted to the hospital with possible symptoms. 

Despite an intense bout of public and media-driven fear, Frieden made sure to stress that the second case doesn't drastically change things. 

"It doesn't change the bottom line," he said. "We know how Ebola spreads, we know how to stop it from spreading. But it does reemphasize how meticulous we have to be on every single control method." 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Sophie Kleeman

Sophie is a staff writer at Mic covering the intersection of tech and culture. She's based in New York and can be reached at sophie@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Will Justice Anthony Kennedy retire at end of Supreme Court term? Here's what we know.

Rumors that the 80-year-old swing justice may leave the bench are fueling fear of a second Trump pick on the nation's high court.

3 states and D.C. allow same flammable building materials behind Grenfell Tower fire

The causes of London's Grenfell Tower are similar to the justifications used to waive fire regulations in the U.S.

New Jersey bill would require kids to be taught how to interact with police

Students from kindergarten through 12th grade would receive the education.

UK Parliament hit with cyberattack

Members of Parliament had difficulty accessing their emails Saturday in the wake of the attack.

Istanbul LGBT pride march banned by government for safety concerns

A right-wing nationalist group has vowed to stop the protest.

Compounds seized by US in December reportedly contained material useful in Russia probe

The Trump administration has reportedly been considering returning the New York and Maryland compounds to Russia.

Will Justice Anthony Kennedy retire at end of Supreme Court term? Here's what we know.

Rumors that the 80-year-old swing justice may leave the bench are fueling fear of a second Trump pick on the nation's high court.

3 states and D.C. allow same flammable building materials behind Grenfell Tower fire

The causes of London's Grenfell Tower are similar to the justifications used to waive fire regulations in the U.S.

New Jersey bill would require kids to be taught how to interact with police

Students from kindergarten through 12th grade would receive the education.

UK Parliament hit with cyberattack

Members of Parliament had difficulty accessing their emails Saturday in the wake of the attack.

Istanbul LGBT pride march banned by government for safety concerns

A right-wing nationalist group has vowed to stop the protest.

Compounds seized by US in December reportedly contained material useful in Russia probe

The Trump administration has reportedly been considering returning the New York and Maryland compounds to Russia.