14 Heartbreaking Photos Show the Aftermath of the Taliban's Brutal Attack on a School

14 Heartbreaking Photos Show the Aftermath of the Taliban's Brutal Attack on a School
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Pakistani Taliban gunmen murdered 132 students and nine teachers Tuesday at a military school in Peshawar in the country's bloodiest terror attack in recent memory. Pakistan began three days of mourning Wednesday for the victims.

New details are emerging as military investigators and media explore the Army Public School. Insurgents stormed the army-run school and systematically went from room to room shooting children during an eight-hour killing spree, reports say.

"They burnt a teacher in front of the students in a classroom," a military source told NBC News. "They literally set the teacher on fire with gasoline and made the kids watch." The attack was so gruesome that even the Afghan Taliban, which the New York Times said "has pushed civilian casualties in Afghanistan to a new high in the past year," denounced the attack as "un-Islamic" and expressed sympathy with the victims' families.

Despite the horrors of the Taliban's depraved massacre, observers around the world are showing solidarity with the Pakistani people and sending a message to the Taliban: We will not be cowed by terror.

The photos below capture the bloody aftermath of the Taliban's attack — and a glimmer of solidarity around the world.

Chairs are upturned and blood stains the floor at the Army Public School auditorium the day after Taliban gunmen stormed the school in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014.
Source: 
AP
Pakistani video journalists film inside the auditorium of an Army Public School a day after an attack by the Taliban, in Peshawar, Pakistan, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014.
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Getty Images
Bullet holes are seen in the wall at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014.
Source: 
Getty Images
A Pakistani soldier shows the media a burnt classroom at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014.
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Getty Images
Blood traces are seen at the ladder of school after Taliban attack on an army-run school on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014. A
Source: 
Getty Images
Source: AP
Bullet traces are seen on the walls in an army-run school after Taliban attack on Tuesday, in Peshawar, Pakistan, on December 17, 2014.
Source: 
Getty Images
Pakistani soldiers and media gather in a ceremony hall at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014.
Source: 
AP
Pakistani soldiers and media gather in a ceremony hall at an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014.
Source: 
Getty Images
Pakistani soldiers walk amidst the debris in an army-run school a day after an attack by Taliban militants in Peshawar on December 17, 2014.
Source: 
Getty Images

Despite the horrors in Peshawar, there's a ray of light: Pakistan's long-time geopolitical rival of India has put aside decades of political and military tensions to show solidarity with their neighbors. Prime Minister Narendra Modi appealed to all Indian schools to observe two minutes of silence Wednesday for the "senseless act of unspeakable brutality" in Peshawar, and thousands of Indians took to social media to show their support with the hashtag #IndiaWithPakistan.

The world is sending a clear message to the Taliban: We're not afraid of you.

Indian Muslim children pray at a madrasa, or religious school, for Tuesday's Taliban attack victims in Peshawar, in Ahmadabad, India, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014.
Source: 
AP
India schoolchildren observe a two-minute silence for victims killed in a Taliban attack on a military-run school in Peshawar, in New Delhi, India, Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014.
Source: 
AP
Indian schoolchildren hold placards and candles as they pay tribute to Pakistan children and staff killed in a Taliban attack on a school in Peshawar, at a school in Amritsar on December 17, 2014.
Source: 
Getty Images
Indian schoolchildren hold placards as they pay tribute to Pakistan children and staff killed in a Taliban attack on a school in Peshawar, during morning assembly at their school in Siliguri on December 17, 2014.
Source: 
Getty Images

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Jared Keller

Jared Keller is the former director of news at Mic.

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