J.K. Rowling Was Asked About LGBT Students at Hogwarts — And Her Response Was Perfect

J.K. Rowling Was Asked About LGBT Students at Hogwarts — And Her Response Was Perfect
Source: AP
Source: AP

Hogwart's School of Witchcraft and Wizardry was a safe place for all.

During a question-and-answer session on Twitter, a fan asked Harry Potter creator J.K. Rowling if there were any LGBT students at the fictional wizarding academy:

To which Rowling replied:

Turns out, Hogwarts was a progressive place. She also said that Anthony Goldstein, a Ravenclaw, was one of several Jewish wizards that were in attendance. (There were, however, no Wiccans.)

But it's also not totally surprising: A study conducted over the summer revealed that young people who read and discussed the book were much less likely to show prejudice against stigmatized groups. 

With positive news like that, how about Rowling for Secretary of Education?

h/t BuzzFeed

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Jordan Valinsky

Jordan is a writer at the Live News desk. He's previously written for The Week, Betabeat, The Daily Dot and CNN.com.

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