Watch Ellen Degeneres Shut Down a Homophobic Hater in the Funniest Way Possible

If there's anything we've learned within the past week, it's that love is stronger than hate — and Ellen DeGeneres is a living example.

The universally beloved talk show was a target of a hate-filled Christian Post column titled "Are You Aware of the Avalanche of Gay Programming Assaulting Your Home?" Published last week, it was written by conservative pastor and noted heterosexist idiot Larry Tomczak, who claims Hollywood pushes an "immoral," "indecent" and "shameful" homosexual agenda that's poisoning children et cetera. Tomczak ridicules DeGeneres in the article by mocking her "marriage" (with scare quotes) and says she uses guests like Taylor Swift to "attract young girls."

Well, let's just say Degeneres had a few words for him on Wednesday's show. "I don't usually read anything about myself," she said. "First of all, I'm not 'married.' I'm married. That's all."

"Larry, I don't even know about what it means to celebrate my lesbianism. I mean, well, I guess I do," she said, setting off a party popper. "Yay! I'm gay!"

After mocking Tomczak's criticisms of other shows like Glee and Modern Family that "promote homosexuality," she turned serious. 

"The only way I'm trying to influence people is to be more kind and compassionate to each other with the message I'm sending out," she said. "I don't have an agenda."

"I'm not here to brainwash anyone," DeGeneres added, before holding a spinning vortex prop to "brainwash" her audience.

"Attention, youth of the world: I want you to live your lives being exactly who you are, " she said. "Be true to yourself — the most important thing is to be true to yourself."

h/t The Wrap

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Jordan Valinsky

Jordan is a writer at the Live News desk. He's previously written for The Week, Betabeat, The Daily Dot and CNN.com.

MORE FROM

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.

Charleena Lyles was a "powerful lady" — until she faced Seattle's flawed criminal justice system

Like Charleena Lyles, women who experience mental health instabilities have been more likely than men to encounter a criminal justice system that is ill-equipped to treat them.

NFL players donate $20,000 to youth football team that was punished for national anthem protest

"We wanted to make sure that we sent those kids the message that it's OK to stand up for what you believe in," Malcolm Jenkins said.

10 things you might have recently missed in the movement for social justice

From Charleena Lyles and Nabra Hassanen to acquittals and vigils, the last few days haven't been easy to keep up with.

Judge declares mistrial in retrial of officer who fatally shot Samuel DuBose

The jury spent five days deliberating Ray Tensing's fate.

University of Missouri to revoke Bill Cosby's honorary degree

The president of Mizzou said Cosby's actions were not in line with the university's core beliefs.

The Movement for Black Lives responds to recent claims of a fractured coalition

"We make no assumptions that everyone and everything within our movement is perfect — far from it," organizers said.