DISCLOSE Act Shows Republicans Hide Behind Their Super PACs

Political Action Committees (PACs) are not required to disclose their donors. Hundreds of millions of dollars can be poured into "Super PACs" to flood the airwaves with negative ads.  This can dramatically alter the course of elections.

This week, Republicans blocked the DISCLOSE Act, which requires PACs to disclose all donors who gave more than $10,000. They blocked it by filibuster, which requires 60 votes to end. The vote was in favor of the measure 51-44, enough to pass, but Republicans continued abusing the filibuster to block the legislation. (Take a deeper look at what the DISCLOSE Act involves in an article by Ahren Stroming.)

This is the same method Republicans used to block 17 pieces of Jobs Legislation that Obama proposed.

If Republicans do not want to disclose their donors above $10,000, then they must be hiding something. What are they trying to hide?

Let's consider the possibilities. The conditions of zero disclosure, which exist now, allow the funding to come from anywhere. Some are writing checks for millions of dollars, all to influence  your opinion. Republicans don't want you to know who is writing the checks for millions and millions of dollars.

That leaves voters wondering. Are the Chinese writing checks? How about Iran? Or health care companies abusing Medicare? Or casino billionaires?

The problem is, we simply don't know who is donating, and fact-checking is impossible.

There is an online petition to support the DISCLOSE Act. Your signature on a petition might be the best influence you could have to prevent government for the highest bidder.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Benjamin Feinblum

Serial-Entrepreneur CEO Biz Owner. Follow @JoinTeamAmerica a bipartisan team producing ideas to improve America and government policy. I am vehemently against those who work to score political points rather than provide solutions. I fight to point out when bias and misinformation are being put forwards. I believe our Democracy is a gift, it needs to be cherished, and honored by having well thought out debate, with primary source data to back up statements. Especially, while we are holding up Democracy as the example to the world. I am an independent who will appear partisan, but only when challenging those who are working to score political points rather than working to find solutions to build success in America. Bottom line: Policies need input from each perspective. Real problems need to be addressed in ways that actually get the job done. Policies should find the line between maximum individual responsibility and minimum input of government resources; that will actually get the job done. All government programs have major problems and must be put into a rigorous and constant state of improvement. While they all have major problems, the US military is the strongest in the history of the world, NASA has had the greatest exploration achievements off planet Earth in the history of mankind, and somehow America is the number one economy in the world. I believe the most important organization to support and put energy into today is www.nolabels.org

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