8 Reasons Everyone on Welfare Needs to Get Drug Tested Right Now

There's a rash spreading across America, and we need to make sure every state gets it: new legislation that forces people on welfare to be drug-tested.

It's common sense. Everyone knows that beneficiaries of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program (a.k.a. welfare) spend millions, maybe billions (trillions?!) in taxpayer money to fuel their drug addictions. (Not to mention what they spend on strip clubs, luxury vacations and filet mignons, as one Missouri legislator recently called out.)

Just look at the data: Seven states already actively drug test people on welfare, and 2015 could be the year this tremendous idea spreads across the country. Elected officials in Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Montana, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas and West Virginia are now planning to consider it.

Not convinced it's a good idea? Consider the evidence:

1. Florida used to test every welfare recipient, and the results were shocking:

Source: Politifact

2. Missouri screened over 30,000 welfare applicants, and look what they found:

Source: TP

3. Arizona also uncovered a huge scourge after testing:

Source: TP

4. When you look at all seven states that actively test welfare recipients, the results are truly horrifying:

Source: TP

5. This is so clearly a good use of our time and money:

Source: TP

6. The wisdom of this policy is staring us straight in the face:

Source: TP

7. State by state by state by state, we see the benefits:

Source: TP

8. Drug testing people is everything the United States of America is all about:


This year, elected officials across the country will have the opportunity to send a clear and effective message: If you have children and desperately need $303 a month (as it was in Florida) to buy food and essentials, you can have it. You just have to wait in line, navigate the bureaucracy, fill out forms, tell us about your private life and pee in this cup.

Let's do this!

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Michael McCutcheon

Michael was formerly special projects editor at Mic. Prior to that, he worked at the Open Society Foundations on electoral reform. A native Seattleite, he's still mad about the SuperSonics.

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