Turning Anti-Gay Fliers Into Confetti Is the Perfect Middle Finger to Homophobic Bigots

Source: Youtube
Source: Youtube

An Irish paper company has turned bigotry on its head in the most "Fuck yeah!" way possible.

Dublin-based Daintree Paper came up with a genius way to repurpose a recent rash of hateful anti-gay leaflets that have been making their way across Ireland: Turn them into heart-shaped confetti to be used by same-sex couples at weddings.

They've taken propaganda that says things like "Should children be exposed to sounds of sodomy?" and "At this very moment, the liberal agenda conspires to undermine God's word and is drafting law to allow homosexuals to adopt children," then transformed it into delightful packages of love and acceptance.

"The Adfam literature was brought to our attention by lots of people online who were shocked to have received it," Nichola Doyle, a store manager at Daintree, told Mic in an email, referring to the Alliance for the Defense of the Family and Marriage. "We were equally as shocked and thought that something needed to be done to get rid of it all."

Source: YouTube

The campaign, which they've titled "Shred of Decency," is intended to support show support for the Yes Campaign in Ireland's upcoming marriage equality referendum. For the low price of about $5 U.S., you can buy a pretty bag of confetti and use it to shower people with ingeniously repurposed shreds of love. 

Best of all? The proceeds go to Yes Equality, a national campaign designed to get people to vote in favor of marriage equality.

It even comes with its own hashtag to encourage people to join in:

"The idea has spread so quickly, it's amazing," Doyle told Mic. "We have orders and emails of support from all around the world!"

Ireland will vote on the Marriage Equality referendum on May 22

h/t The Daily Dot

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Sophie Kleeman

Sophie is a staff writer at Mic covering the intersection of tech and culture. She's based in New York and can be reached at sophie@mic.com.

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