50 Shades of Grey Movie: Michael Fassbender, Not Ryan Gosling, Should Be Cast as Christian Grey

Michael Fassbender, the Irish-German actor best known for playing Lieutenant Archie Hicoxin Inglorious Basterds and Magneto in X-Men: First Classsaid the role of David -- the futuristic android he plays in Ridley Scott’s upcomin Prometheus (opposing Charlize Theron) -- was inspired in David Bowie and Olympic diver Greg Louganis.

Fassbender is currently promoting the science fiction film in a media blitz that could lead to more upcoming projects, including the film version of E.L. James’ controversial novel Fifty Shades of Grey as Christian Grey the sadist business tycoon.

Many have speculated that Ryan Gosling (The NotebookThe Ides of March) is more appropriate for the role of Christian Grey – the business tycoon who has a dark and disturbing sex life – due to the actor’s good looks and popularity among female viewers.

However, Gosling is too "vanilla" for the part, and his popularity among women is due to the sensible and not threatening roles he usually plays. The Canadian actor would be the wrong cast for Fifty Shades of Grey, he would embarrass himself and loose many fans in the process of playing an abusive sadist with no respect for women.  

Fassbender, on the other hand, would be perfect in the role of Christian Grey. Though he doesn’t have “pretty boy” looks like Gosling does, Fassbender has proved himself with edgier and more intense roles – such as in Shame, where the actor performed several frontal nude and sexually explicit scenes.

Since Shame wasn’t widely distributed in the United States, Michael Fassbender’s fans who know him by X-Men or Inglorious Basterds would be shocked to know this actor is talented and versatile enough to perform in superhero’s blockbusters as well as in darker and less commercial cinema. This is why Michael Fassbender, and not Ryan Gosling, should be cast as Christian Grey.

Watch the trailer of Shame:


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