Yes, You Can Now Buy a "My Parents Swiped Right" Baby Onesie

Yes, You Can Now Buy a "My Parents Swiped Right" Baby Onesie
Source: TinderBaby
Source: TinderBaby

It was inevitable.

Pair an estimated 50 million users with 1 billion profile swipes per a day and what will you eventually get? Tinder babies — and a Tinder onesie.

The newly released clothing item, sold by the aptly named website Tinder Baby, hilariously reads, "My parents swiped right." It's a reference to the now iconic swipe-left, swipe-right selection process — but it's also a somewhat terrifying harbinger of a new era of families.

Ronny Sage, co-creator of Tinder Baby, believes that "Generation Tinder-baby" is already a thing, and we all better get on board.

"One of my close friends told us that their friend is having a baby with someone they met on Tinder. I was like, 'No f-ing way,'" Sage told DNAinfo Chicago. "From that moment, we imagined the onesie. ... I looked up the [domain name] and I couldn't believe the website was still available." 

Yes, this is our future:

Source: TinderBaby

Creepy and unserious as Tinder's reputation is, we shouldn't be so shocked. Founded in 2012, the so-called "hookup app" has grown into a behemoth dating platform for all sorts of relationships — and a growing rash of Tinder marriages suggests some users are swiping to "I do."

"We're one of the select few who didn't use Tinder to just get a NCMO (Non-Committal Make Out)," a Tinder bride wrote on her blog Right Swiped. Another couple, both divorcees in their 40s, had their Tinder-born wedding profiled in the New York Times' prestigious Vows section. As more daters start taking the app seriously as a way to meet long-term matches, babies — and Tinder-fied baby gear — are bound to happen.

A photo posted by (@) on

The onesie, however ridiculous, does prove something serious: The last vestige of embarrassment or shame over online dating has faded away. A 2013 Pew Research Center survey found 59% of Americans say it's normal to meet online. Bibs, bottles and tees celebrating that fact only prove further the stigma is nearly extinct.

The $19.99 onesie may start off as just a gag gift for millennials, but something tells us that the "Tinder baby" is more than just a joke — it's our future.

h/t DNAinfo Chicago

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Kate Hakala

Kate is a freelance writer and regular contributor to Mic. A former editor of Nerve, her writing has also appeared in the The New York Times, Playboy, Refinery29, Salon, and The Daily Dot. On most days she is thinking of Louis C.K.

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