If Your Dog Could Take Photos, This Is What They'd Look Like

Source: YouTube
Source: YouTube

What does the world look like to your dog when she's the happiest? Now we know.

Heartography, a project from Nikon Asia, uses the pup's heart rate to snap a photo of what she sees. It's actually really simple technology: A heart monitor attached to a Nikon Coolpix L31 camera sends a signal each time the dog experiences a sudden heart rate spike, automatically snapping a picture.

So get ready to see a lot of leashes, squirrels, tennis balls and treats. Or in the case of Nikon's first "pho-dog-rapher," Grizzler, a lot of fellow animals and some baked beans.

Grizzler on the prowl
Source: 
Nikon
Photos taken by Grizzler
Source: 
Nikon Asia

The adorable factor here is high, and hopefully it means there will be a lot of puppy Instagram accounts that show life from the eye of an excited dog.

But this technology could be so much more. Equipped with the Heartography camera, dogs could take pictures of home intruders. Animals used in search-and-rescue missions could document their surroundings when they find survivors. Places too small for humans to enter could be photographed from the inside by a smaller dog. Nikon's creation could be used to do a lot of good.

And maybe that will happen. But we'd also be happy seeing Grizzler running around doing puppy things. Because he's the hero Instagram deserves and the hero it needs right now.

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Max Plenke

Max Plenke is a staff writer at Mic, where he covers breaking news, climate science, health and the future. His work has appeared in Esquire, GQ and Wallpaper. Send story tips to max@mic.com.

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