In One Tweet, This Man Took Down a Group of Incredibly Sexist Internet Trolls

In One Tweet, This Man Took Down a Group of Incredibly Sexist Internet Trolls

Luckily for Adam Harris and his new wife, Tisa Forrest, their wedding photographer captured one of the most poignant moments of their ceremony: Harris' tears of joy upon seeing his soon-to-be wife walk down the aisle. But this beautiful moment was tainted when an anti-feminist group tweeted the images to promote their misogynistic views.

On Saturday, the Twitter account "Meninist" tweeted images of Harris and Forrest with the caption, "He's thinking about all the side hoes he has to give up."

The set of photos had been used in other memes over the last few months, but this was hardly an accurate representation of the image. After learning about the tweet, Harris quickly set the record straight with a tweet of his own.

"Or I was thinking about my wife," he replied. "But you know, do you."

"I've actively opposed the offensive [tweets] or ones that are plainly not funny," Harris told BuzzFeed about his reaction to their use of his photo. But rather than match the Meninist account's inflammatory tone, Harris took a different approach.

"I'm a rather level-headed person so I just reacted how I would normally — just to brush it off," he said. He instead explained the reality was that when he saw his wife he "couldn't hold back feelings of excitement and love."

To date, Harris' response has been retweeted more than 76,000 times while the Meninist's initial tweet — sent to 876,000 followers — has been retweeted around 5,500. Harris' "level-headed" approach is clearly one that has resonated.

This is hardly the first time the Meninist account has shared its sexist commentary. In the past few days alone, the account's tweets have continued to reinforce age-old gender stereotypes about women's dependence and manipulation of men. 

This single account is hardly alone in these efforts, though. The meninist hashtag that launched the concept, #MeninistTwitter, was initially started years ago as a way for men to "express the difficulties of being a man in the 21st century," BBC reported in 2013. It has since morphed into a conversation about why "men can't have the same equality as women" and to "air genuine grievances with feminism," BuzzFeed's Rossalyn Warren noted in December.

Unfortunately, meninists will undoubtedly continue to oppose promote their sexist beliefs, but happily we have individuals like Harris pushing back on in level-headed ways.