Dylann Roof's Terrifying Manifesto Has Been Discovered — Here Are the Shocking Excerpts

Source: Last Rhodesian
Source: Last Rhodesian

The manifesto of mass murderer Dylann Storm Roof, the 21-year-old South Carolina man who attacked Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church last week and killed nine African-American congregants, has been discovered online by Twitter users Emma Quangel and Henry Krinkle.

The manifesto, found on a website titled "Last Rhodesian," contained both a rambling text file describing Roof's ideology and motives as well as a .zip file containing photographs of Roof. The contents leave no doubt that the shooting was racially motivated, as it is full of justifications of white supremacy, neo-Nazi symbolism such as references to the number 88 and racist diatribes against people of color.

Mic has chosen to republish excerpts from the manifesto in order to dispel any explanations for the attack that ignore the role the politics of white supremacy played in this terrible crime. 

These excerpts from Last Rhodesian, which Mic has verified was registered by a person using Roof's name, address and a white power-related email address in February, follow below:

On Trayvon Martin and George Zimmerman: "I read the Wikipedia article and right away I was unable to understand what the big deal was. It was obvious that Zimmerman was in the right. But more importantly this prompted me to type in the words 'black on White crime' into Google, and I have never been the same since that day."

On the rationale for white power: "Say you were to witness a dog being beat by a man. You are almost surely going to feel very sorry for that dog. But then say you were to witness a dog biting a man. You will most likely not feel the same pity you felt for the dog for the man. Why? Because dogs are lower than men. This same analogy applies to black and White relations."

On segregation: "Segregation was not a bad thing. It was a defensive measure. Segregation did not exist to hold back negroes. It existed to protect us from them. And I mean that in multiple ways. Not only did it protect us from having to interact with them, and from being physically harmed by them, but it protected us from being brought down to their level. Integration has done nothing but bring Whites down to level of brute animals. The best example of this is obviously our school system."

On the biological basis of white supremacy: "Anyone who thinks that White and black people look as different as we do on the outside, but are somehow magically the same on the inside, is delusional. How could our faces, skin, hair, and body structure all be different, but our brains be exactly the same? This is the nonsense we are led to believe. Negroes have lower Iqs, lower impulse control, and higher testosterone levels in generals. These three things alone are a recipe for violent behavior."

On white culture: "Many White people feel as though they dont have a unique culture. The reason for this is that White culture is world culture. I dont mean that our culture is made up of other cultures, I mean that our culture has been adopted by everyone in the world. This makes us feel as though our culture isnt special or unique."

On why he chose Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church: "I have no choice. I am not in the position to, alone, go into the ghetto and fight. I chose Charleston because it is most historic city in my state, and at one time had the highest ratio of blacks to Whites in the country. We have no skinheads, no real KKK, no one doing anything but talking on the internet. Well someone has to have the bravery to take it to the real world, and I guess that has to be me."

The final lines: "Unfortunately at the time of writing I am in a great hurry and some of my best thoughts, actually many of them have been to be left out and lost forever. But I believe enough great White minds are out there already."

"Please forgive any typos, I didnt have time to check it."

This is a breaking news story and will be updated as more information becomes available.

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Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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