10 Photos of Historic Landmarks Proudly Going Rainbow for the SCOTUS Marriage Ruling

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Americans all over the country took to the streets, airwaves and LGBT landmarks like the Stonewall Inn to celebrate the Supreme Court's historic ruling making gay marriage a constitutional right on Friday.

Many of the nation's most historic landmarks lit up with rainbow colors to show solidarity. From the White House and One World Trade Center to Minneapolis' 35-W bridge, America proudly went super gay last night, joined by international well-wishers who did the same for landmarks like the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin and Niagara Falls in Canada.

1. The White House, Washington, D.C.

2. Brandenburg Gate, Berlin

3. California State Capitol

4. San Francisco City Hall

Source: Jeff Chiu/AP

5. One World Trade Center, New York City

6. Niagara Falls, Canada

7. Empire State Building, New York City

8. Disney's Cinderella Castle, Orlando, Florida

9. Minneapolis' 35-W Bridge

10. Control Tower, San Francisco International Airport

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Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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