Lil B's Apology for His Transphobic Tweet Will Restore Your Faith That People Can Change

Lil B's Apology for His Transphobic Tweet Will Restore Your Faith That People Can Change
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

On Monday evening, rapper Lil B made a social media faux pas when he sent out the following tweet to his 1.15 million followers:

Twitter's reaction incited Lil B to rescind the remarks, apologize and say he was "still growing" — all within an hour of his first post.

Instead of defending himself or cowering, Lil B realized what he said, and as part of his apology, began retweeting people's objections. 

He also took the time to dole out a piecemeal apology of his own.

Lil B's apology and respective change in his perspective is unusual, to say the least. "Homophobia and transphobia in hip-hop are well-documented," reported the Daily Beast after artists such as Snoop Dogg and Timbaland mocked Caitlyn Jenner's transition. The rapper embraced his phobia for what it was: insecurity and fear of what he doesn't understand. "I need help to learn to accept[.] I'm scared because I'm not comfortable with my self [sic][.]" 

Fans ended up praising him for his about-face. 

The Twitter frenzy comes at a time when support for trans rights is on the rise in the United States. Public figures like Caitlyn Jenner and Laverne Cox have made the issue more high-profile, and tolerance for transphobia is waning across the country. What started off as a lone, bigoted comment turned into a larger conversation about the transgender community and equality. 

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Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

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