Mar-a-Lago Club, a Donald Trump Company, Has Been Trying to Import Foreign Workers

Mar-a-Lago Club, a Donald Trump Company, Has Been Trying to Import Foreign Workers
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Florida, a sprawling luxury resort that's among the most exclusive of its kind in the country, has tried to recruit hundreds of foreign workers through a temporary work visa program since 2006, despite the Republican presidential front-runner having frequently accused immigrants of taking jobs away from Americans. Turns out, Trump's companies could be the ones giving those jobs away in the first place. 

The revelation was part of a recent Reuters investigation into U.S. Department of Labor data that found Trump-owned companies had tried to recruit at least 1,100 foreign workers over the past 15 years. Mar-a-Lago was the biggest seeker of foreign workers out of the bunch, which included eight other Trump-owned companies. 

Of the 787 applications the Mar-a-Lago Club submitted since 2006, there were 70 applications submitted this month, for maids, cooks and servers, Reuters reported. It's unclear whether the workers would be from Mexico, however the investigation found at least 80% of the more than 100,000 foreign workers who were granted temporary work visas to the United States in 2013 were of Mexican origin. 

Donald Trump, his wife, Melania Trump, and their son Barron Trump attend the Trump Invitational Grand Prix at the Mar-a-Lago Club on Jan. 4, 2015 in Palm Beach, Florida.
Source: 
Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images

The practice of hiring foreign workers for low-wage jobs is not uncommon in hospitality and landscaping industries. The United States' H-2B visa program allows employers to temporarily hire foreigners to perform non-agricultural labor or services.

Trump, who has run on a platform of shoring up the U.S. border with Mexico, has frequently said he'll bring jobs back to Americans. "A lot of people ... can't get jobs," Trump said during his campaign announcement in New York in June. "They can't get jobs, because there are no jobs, because China has our jobs and Mexico has our jobs. They all have jobs."

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Philip Ross

Philip Ross is the Editorial Director for Search at 'Mic.' He previously reported for the International Business Times.

MORE FROM

Warrant suggests Justine Damond may have slapped police cruiser before she was fatally shot

The officers involved in the shooting remain on paid administrative leave.

House passes new sanctions against Russia by an enormous margin

The bill also places limits on Trump’s power to ease or end penalties against Russia.

Paul Manafort is meeting with Senate investigators. Here’s what we know about his Russia ties.

Paul Manafort has Russia links dating back more than 10 years.

Yes, Donald Trump can fire Robert Mueller. Here’s how he can do it.

It's a complicated process, and it could get messy, but he can do it.

Charlie Gard’s parents say they want to take their son home to die

The parents are returning to court to fight for their right to take their son home.

Vatican shuts off historic fountains in the midst of devastating drought

Officials say it's the first time they can recall ever shutting off the Vatican's fountains.

Warrant suggests Justine Damond may have slapped police cruiser before she was fatally shot

The officers involved in the shooting remain on paid administrative leave.

House passes new sanctions against Russia by an enormous margin

The bill also places limits on Trump’s power to ease or end penalties against Russia.

Paul Manafort is meeting with Senate investigators. Here’s what we know about his Russia ties.

Paul Manafort has Russia links dating back more than 10 years.

Yes, Donald Trump can fire Robert Mueller. Here’s how he can do it.

It's a complicated process, and it could get messy, but he can do it.

Charlie Gard’s parents say they want to take their son home to die

The parents are returning to court to fight for their right to take their son home.

Vatican shuts off historic fountains in the midst of devastating drought

Officials say it's the first time they can recall ever shutting off the Vatican's fountains.