Newly Released Video Shows NYPD Officer Body Slamming Former Tennis Star James Blake

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

The New York Police Department released video Friday of a plain-clothed officer body-slamming and arresting former pro tennis star James Blake as he stood outside the Grad Hyatt hotel in New York Wednesday.

Officer James Frascatore jumped Blake after reportedly misidentifying him as a suspect in a case of credit card fraud. 

NYPD police commissioner William Bratton later apologized to Blake over the misidentification, and the department announced Frascatore had been placed on modified assignment. 

"I would be very interested to talk with [Blake] to extend my apologies for the incident," Bratton said Thursday. The commissioner forcefully pushed back any allegation that the incident was racially motivated. "This rush to put a race tag on it; I'm sorry, that's not involved in this incident at all," he said at a press conference, Fox News reported.  

Blake was visiting New York to meet with corporate sponsors in the run up to the United States Open. In 2006, he was ranked 4th in the world, the Associated Press reported

"He picked me up and body-slammed me and put me on the ground and told me to turn over and shut my mouth and put the cuffs on me," Blake told Good Morning America on Thursday. "I do think most cops are doing a great job keeping us safe, but when you police with reckless abandon, you need to be held accountable."

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Jon Levine

Jon Levine is a staff writer at Mic, covering politics and people. He is based in New York and can be reached at JLevine@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

American Health Care Act by the numbers: What to know about Senate Republicans' secret health plan

After drafting the ACA repeal and replace plan behind closed doors, the AHCA is out — and Senate Republican leaders are hoping to vote on it in a week.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

American Health Care Act by the numbers: What to know about Senate Republicans' secret health plan

After drafting the ACA repeal and replace plan behind closed doors, the AHCA is out — and Senate Republican leaders are hoping to vote on it in a week.