Antonin Scalia Attacks Supreme Court for Same-Sex Marriage Ruling in Rhodes College Speech

Antonin Scalia Attacks Supreme Court for Same-Sex Marriage Ruling in Rhodes College Speech
Source: AP
Source: AP

On Tuesday, Justice Antonin Scalia lambasted his own Supreme Court for ruling in favor of legalizing same-sex marriage across the United States. During a speech at Rhodes College, the university his grandson attends, Scalia spoke to 500 attendees at the school's Constitution Day and described the decision as "the furthest imaginable extension of the Supreme Court doing whatever it wants," according to the Associated Press.

"Saying that the Constitution requires that practice, which is contrary to the religious beliefs of many of our citizens, I don't know how you can get more extreme than that," Scalia said, the AP reports. "I worry about a Court that's headed in that direction."

Scalia didn't hesitate to criticize his colleagues, five of whom voted in favor of same-sex marriage, saying they were not representative of America as a whole, but the East and West coasts, from which several of them come.

"You should be upset because these people are making a new Constitution and they are terribly unrepresentative of the country," he said.

Source: Mic/AP

Scalia is the longest-serving Supreme Court Justice, having sat on the bench for 29 years — he was appointed by then-President Ronald Reagan in 1986. 

Scalia also argued his colleagues who believe the Constitution's interpretation evolves alongside the evolution of the country are actually making the Constitution less flexible.

"It's no use talking about abortion anymore. It's just off the democratic stage," he said at Rhodes. "No use arguing about it, coast to coast, now and forever, or unless the Supreme Court changes its mind. Is that flexibility?"

The justice strongly opposed the June 26 Obergefell v. Hodges ruling, which nationally legalized the rights of same-sex couples to marry.  He wrote a scathing dissent on the decision: "When the Fourteenth Amendment was ratified in 1868, every State limited marriage to one man and one woman, and no one doubted the constitutionality of doing so. That resolves these cases." 

"The opinion is couched in a style that is as pretentious as its content is egotistic," Scalia added. 

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

MORE FROM

70% of Muslims still believe in the American dream, according to new Pew study

Despite high rates of discrimination, Muslims are optimistic about their lives in the United States.

Man with Nazi tattoos at Cleveland Indians game sparks outrage. The Indians’ mascot is still racist.

Swastikas are bad. So is Chief Wahoo.

Baton Rouge police chief resigns after a year of political turmoil over Alton Sterling shooting

Baton Rouge's mayor had campaigned on a promise to replace the city's police chief, in the wake of Alton Sterling's shooting death.

‘Whose Streets?’ film highlights Ferguson activists’ battle with the trauma of protests

Brittany Ferrell, an organizer of the Ferguson Uprising, says a new documentary about Black Lives Matter protests shows why activists should be more intentional about checking in on each other.

Minneapolis police chief resigns after fatal shooting of Australian woman

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau announced in a Facebook post that she is stepping aside.

Mentally ill prisoners in Louisiana forced to bark like dogs for food, lawsuit claims

Investigators came. Everyone was told not to speak to them.

70% of Muslims still believe in the American dream, according to new Pew study

Despite high rates of discrimination, Muslims are optimistic about their lives in the United States.

Man with Nazi tattoos at Cleveland Indians game sparks outrage. The Indians’ mascot is still racist.

Swastikas are bad. So is Chief Wahoo.

Baton Rouge police chief resigns after a year of political turmoil over Alton Sterling shooting

Baton Rouge's mayor had campaigned on a promise to replace the city's police chief, in the wake of Alton Sterling's shooting death.

‘Whose Streets?’ film highlights Ferguson activists’ battle with the trauma of protests

Brittany Ferrell, an organizer of the Ferguson Uprising, says a new documentary about Black Lives Matter protests shows why activists should be more intentional about checking in on each other.

Minneapolis police chief resigns after fatal shooting of Australian woman

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau announced in a Facebook post that she is stepping aside.

Mentally ill prisoners in Louisiana forced to bark like dogs for food, lawsuit claims

Investigators came. Everyone was told not to speak to them.