These Photos of World Leaders With Man Buns Are Haunting Our Dreams

DesignCrowd

Have we reached peak man bun? Are they the trendiest style around or already woefully uncool? Are they the worst iteration of hipsterdom this century has yet seen?

The answer to those burning questions is now here, in the form of a clever Photoshop project. When the leaders of the world, from Putin to the pope, are wearing man buns, you know we've reached peak.

DesignCrowd, an Australia-based online graphic design marketplace, issued a challenge to graphic designers online: "Photoshop Design Job: Give famous politicians man buns!"

The result was 101 submissions from 42 designers, many of which are so slick and life-like, you'd think the world's presidents and prime ministers had all gotten drunk together and stumbled into a Brooklyn hair salon, to emerge with perfectly tied topknots worthy of Instagram. 

Can you imagine? You don't need to. Here is...

President Barack Obama, who, with a top knot, looks eerily like Marc Jacobs.

Source: iMAGICations/DesignCrowd
Source: iMAGICations/DesignCrowd

Kim Jong Un, who doesn't look half-bad, no?

Source: jkrebs04/DesignCrowd
Source: jkrebs04/DesignCrowd

Bill Clinton, whose top knot would have probably looked better with his signature white hair.

Source: Patrick Tero/DesignCrowd
Source: Patrick Tero/DesignCrowd

Abraham Lincoln, who looks just a bit of out place in his 19th-century surroundings.

Source: bijuak/DesignCrowd
Source: bijuak/DesignCrowd

George W. Bush, who's gone with a #GrannyHair version.

Source: tapstudio/DesignCrowd
Source: tapstudio/DesignCrowd

Richard Nixon, who's doing the messy, second-day-hair look.

Source: fcurtis/DesignCrowd
Source: fcurtis/DesignCrowd

And the winner of the DesignCrowd contest, the one and the only Vladimir Putin.

Source: lionx/DesignCrowd
Source: lionx/DesignCrowd

One thing's for certain: These artists are fantastic at Photoshop. But we've learned another thing as well: We never want to see another man bun ever again. 

h/t Glamour Paris

Correction: Oct. 29, 2015

An earlier version of this article misidentified Richard Nixon as Ronald Reagan.