This Mexican TV Host Was Molested Live on the Air, Then Fired

Source: Facebook
Source: Facebook

Often, unwanted sexual harassment goes unreported, but this time, harassment was broadcast for the entire world to see. And it wasn't a mistake. 

Co-hosts Enrique Tovar and Tania Reza of Mexican television station Televisa's show A Toda Máquina engaged in an uncomfortable back and forth that saw Tovar taking swipes at the hem of Reza's dress and then taking a look at her lovely necklace before poking her breasts twice. 

Source: Mic/YouTube

When Reza got upset, Tovar called her "hormonal," which led Reza to rip off her mic and walk off set. "I can't work like this," she said. After the segment, which was filmed on Saturday, went up, the question was not "How could this happen?" or "What should we do?" but "Was this planned?"

After people on social media called for Tovar's immediate termination, Tovar and Reza filmed a short video claiming the entire video was a hoax the pair planned together. They were both fired on Monday.  

A statement from Televisa claims that the co-hosts wanted to make a video that went viral and never informed the network.  

"Televisa strongly condemns this act and any type of harassment," the network wrote in a statement. "In conjunction with [ethics code], we inform you that both presenters have been separated from the company."

The statement also invited Reza to come forward if her account of the events is different than anything previously reported. 

And she did. Reza addressed the incident publicly on her Facebook page on Monday. 

Reza thanked fans for their support and said she was forced to record the video claiming her guilt. She also pointed out that in her six years in the company, she had acted professionally and never lowered herself to this level. 

On Wednesday, after pressure from social media, a Change.org petition and Reza's statement, Televisa reinstated both hosts to the show, Remezcla reports. They also said they'd reopen the investigation into what exactly happened during the segment. Of course, people can see what happened: It's on tape. 

Source: YouTube

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Mathew Rodriguez

Mathew Rodriguez is a Staff Writer at Mic. He is a queer Latino New Yorker who enjoys female rappers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Flannery O'Connor. He is a former editor at TheBody.com and he is working on a memoir.

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