This Japanese Invention Lets You Stay Cozy Under a Blanket Literally All Day

Source: Belle Maison
Source: Belle Maison

When dreary winter months hit, there's nothing we want more than to crank up the heater, curl up under a blanket and stay there as long as possible. 

So it's no shock that a piece of furniture that's part table, part blanket and part heater is grabbing the attention of lazy people everywhere. The kotatsu is a Japanese table with a built-in heater and a blanket that covers all four sides and traps the heat underneath. It sits low to the ground, per Japanese tradition, and is meant for people to sit with their legs beneath it.

Kotatsu tables have been around for centuries in some form. Now there's an exciting innovation: couches and other seating options designed to complement the kotatsuBack support? Check. Reclining seat? Check. All-around amazing, cozy-as-hell experience? Check.

Just look at how comfortable these folks look.

Source: Belle Maison
Source: Belle Maison
Source: Belle Maison
Source: Belle Maison

If you're not familiar with the kotatsu, it has a long, long history in Japan, with early versions dating back to the 14th century during the Muromachi period. Newer models today are electric-powered, for the most part, as opposed to old-school coal.

In Japan, many buildings aren't properly insulated; instead of central heating, many households rely on individual warming appliances to keep everything pleasant and toasty.

A photo posted by (@) on

By the looks of it, the kotatsu-and-couch combos require a lot of space, meaning we're not sure how practical they are for the tiny-apartmented among us, especially if we've already got central heating. 

But the power of cozy shouldn't be underestimated — after all, what else could make an item as ridiculous and unattractive as the Snuggie (or Ugg boots, for that matter) so successful? We're thinking that the kotatsu might be the best reason yet to work from home. 

Plus, there are adorable versions for cat lovers. We're in.

h/t Refinery29

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Theresa Avila

Theresa is a staff writer covering all things style for Mic. A recent graduate of Columbia Journalism School, Theresa did radio reporting and focused on the public education system in New York City. She's a proud member of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and was part of its 2015 Student Projects. You can send her a note in English, español, or Spanglish at theresa@mic.com.

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