Houston Equal Rights Ordinance: Twitter Reacts to Rejection of HERO, Proposition 1

Houston Equal Rights Ordinance: Twitter Reacts to Rejection of HERO, Proposition 1
Source: AP
Source: AP

Houston residents failed to pass Proposition 1, also know as Houston's Equal Rights Ordinance, or HERO, on Tuesday's election night. The bill would have extended discrimination protection laws to to people based on 15 classes of identity, including gender identity and sexual orientation.

After facing a lengthy, conservative-backed media battle claiming HERO would make it easier for sexual predators to target women in public restrooms, the bill lost by a landslide in the early voting portion of the election, with 65% voting to repeal the measure and only about 35% in support of it. 

Texas Lieutenant Gov. Dan Patrick tweeted his satisfaction with the bill's rejection, writing, "On the defeat of Houston Prop 1. Men, stay out of women's locker rooms and restrooms #NoonHoustonProp1."

However, others across social media weren't as thrilled about HERO's failing. When news began circulating Tuesday night Houston would be removing the ordinance, Texans, progressives and most of the internet immediately began expressing their dismay.

Some Houstonians decided to throw in the towel after Tuesday night and begin looking for other cities to move to:

Houston's fellow Texan neighbors provided some answers, telling the LGBT community they're always welcome in Austin:

Meanwhile, the rest of Twitter was simply shocked by HERO's defeat:

But the fight for equality doesn't appear to be over in Houston just yet:

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Chris Riotta

Chris Riotta is a culture reporter at Mic, covering news, music and entertainment. He is based in New York and can be reached at criotta@mic.com

MORE FROM

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

5 stories from this week that aren't about OJ Simpson or Sean Spicer

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into pardoning himself. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

5 stories from this week that aren't about OJ Simpson or Sean Spicer

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into pardoning himself. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?