Lego Slippers Are Now a Thing, and Parents Everywhere Rejoice

Source: Facebook
Source: Facebook

What is the most painful experience known to humankind? Childbirth? Nah. Frostbite? Pfft. That awful sunburn you got last summer? Nope. 

Come on, you know the one...

A photo posted by (@) on

Yup. 

There it is. 

That excruciating, agonizing, searing, piercing pain you used to get when you stepped on a Lego may officially be a thing of the past because, at last, someone has invented the Lego Slipper

Created by a partnership between the genius minds behind the French advertising agency Brand Station and the iconic Danish toy company, the padded slippers promise that you will never talk through a dark child's playroom in fear again. 

The simple-looking red and yellow slippers are manufactured with a heavily padded insole, a ridged outsole and a Lego insignia stitched on the top. 

A photo posted by (@) on

Feel free to crush all of your child's precious block creations because nothing is getting through these comfy suckers, it would appear.

A photo posted by (@) on

A photo posted by (@) on

But, OK, here comes the bad news: Only 1,500 pairs are available and they'll only be given away to customers who create a "wish list" on the Lego France website. God willing, though, Lego will come to its senses and expand manufacturing for these beautiful creations, at least in time for when we all have children. 

Now that you're super sad that you didn't take French in high school and probably won't end up with a pair yourself, feel free to watch this transfixing video Brand Station posted on its Facebook page of the slippers being stitched together.  

h/t CNET 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Rachel Lubitz

Rachel is a senior Style writer at Mic. She previously worked for The Washington Post's Style section for more than three years. Feel free to contact her at rachel@mic.com.

MORE FROM

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.