Alleged Planned Parenthood Shooter Robert Dear Calls Himself a "Warrior for Babies"

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Robert L. Dear, the 57-year-old accused shooter in the attack on a Planned Parenthood in Colorado Springs, Colorado, on Nov. 27, gave the courts an irrefutable motive on Wednesday: anti-abortionist extremism. Speaking to the court, Dear said he was "guilty" and said there would be no trial because he is "a warrior for the babies," which elicited an outburst from those in the court.

Rick Sallinger, a reporter for CBS4 News in Denver, described the moment on Twitter:

Another reporter on the scene, Corey Hutchins of the Colorado Independent, confirmed Dear's outburst in a tweet.

According to the New York Times, Dear moved to Colorado from North Carolina, where he had lived in a small cabin devoid of electricity and running water. Speaking to the Star Tribune, John Hood, Dear's neighbor in Waterboro, Colorado, described Dear as someone worried about government surveillance. According to Hood, Dear would often skinny dip, hide food in the woods and offer "unsolicited advice" such as outfitting roofs with metal to avoid government spies, the Star Tribune reported. 

Dear is believed to have acted alone in the attacks, during which time he barricaded himself inside the Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood and engaged in a shootout with law enforcement officers responding to the scene. The bloody assault that ensued left three victims dead — 36-year-old mother of two Jennifer Markovsky, 44-year-old Garrett Swasey, an Officer for the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and Ke'Arre Stewart, a 29-year-old Iraq War veteran and father of two. 

"What happened in Colorado Springs was a horrific tragedy," said Vicki Cowart, CEO and President of Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains, in a statement emailed to Mic on Wednesday. "Our focus now is on recovery and making sure this never happens again."

"We continue to provide high-quality, compassionate health care in a safe, supportive environment," Cowart continued in the statement. "Every day since this terrible tragedy, Planned Parenthood's doors have been open across Colorado, across our Rocky Mountain region, and across this country."

Dec. 9, 2015, 4:45 p.m. Eastern: This story has been updated.

Correction: Dec. 9, 2015
An earlier version of this story said that Robert L. Dear lived in a small cabin without electricity or running water in Colorado. Dear lived in that secluded cabin in North Carolina for many years, before moving into a trailer in Hartsell, Colorado.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Liz Rowley

Liz is a staff writer at Mic, covering breaking news. She is based in New York and can be reached at lrowley@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.