Todd Akin Not Qualified, Must Drop Out of Missouri Senate Race Immediately

As Democrats rush to spin the absurd comments of Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin as "the way Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan think" about abortion, women's bodies, etc., this Republican woman has no compunction in concluding that Akin is not qualified to hold public office and should withdraw from the Senate race. The Democrats can save a little money and opponent Claire McCaskill can have free rein to continue her glacially-paced work on behalf of a woman's right to get free birth control pills, or whatever she thinks the job of a U.S. Senator is these days.

I understand that for some, the protection of unborn life trumps every other consideration, under all circumstances. I know two women who were raped, became pregnant, had the babies and raised them as single mothers. Neither of these women should be criticized in any manner because they made this choice — that's the true meaning of "pro choice."

I doubt that's what Akin was talking about. He is beyond confused, and apparently was searching for some justification to deny women who've been victimized the ability to make a different choice. Where his strange concept came from that "women have a way of shutting that down" (i.e. not becoming pregnant) in the case of rape is a mystery. 

Anyone who'd think this is true is de-facto, unqualified to serve as a representative in any legislative body governing others. There aren't too many statements that would cause me to make this assessment. Akin's bizarre beliefs show extraordinary, willful ignorance. He learned this weird, false information from doctors? He must have been talking to the same male physician who informed me that "childbirth may be painful."

Yes, just like, after death, people may stop moving. Amputation may cause the loss of a limb. Childbirth may result in the birth of a baby. Pictures of Kate Upton dancing in a bikini may result in arousal among heterosexual males.

Atheists who don't "get" Christians and fear them? Akin is your man. Akin is both an engineer and an ordained minister — and it's almost impossible for me to believe — a Presbyterian. I say this because I know Presbyterians, and don't know any who think God gave women a special way of fixing that ol' rape problem. He has six children, so I'm thinking he knows at least a few things about how babies are made, though I could be wrong about that. In the past, Akin has also spoken out against the "Morning After" pill or "Plan B." Many people who are militant about abortion oppose this medication, because it does prevent development of a very early pregnancy, and they do not care whether or not fertilization actually occurred.

Maybe there is some type of Republican war on women out there, however. Genius Todd Akin and another guy defeated beautiful, brilliant Sarah Steelman in a three-way battle for the Republican senate nomination in Missouri. Way to go, Missouri Republicans. Way to go.

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Amy Sterling Casil

I am a professional writer and college teacher. My most recent book is Female Science Fiction Writer (http://www.amazon.com/Female-Science-Fiction-Writer-ebook/dp/B008E95D2E) a major short fiction collection. I am a 5th generation Southern California native, and have a colorful heritage in my mother's and my father's families. I have a huge, wonderful exuberant family, including a beautiful daughter and I am very grateful for every opportunity I have had. I have a Jack Russell Terrier named Gambit (Badger died, Gambit is a new rescue) and have always disliked rubber bands. I'm an old school Republican by registration but probably a Libertarian in sentiment. I have a very varied professional background and have been known to raise a few funds in my day. I should add that I am award-nominated fiction writer, have published 26 books, and have two BAs from Scripps College, Claremont, CA and an MFA from Chapman University, Orange, CA. I do professional business consulting and planning and am Founder and CEO of Pacific Human Capital.

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