Here's What Actual Redheads Think of "Kiss a Ginger Day"

Here's What Actual Redheads Think of "Kiss a Ginger Day"

Tuesday is unofficially designated as international "Kiss a Ginger Day," a holiday that celebrates, um, ginger pride? Or kissing? Or maybe the Weasley family?

The holiday is, in part, an attempt to counter ginger discrimination. However, perhaps the best way to understand "Kiss a Ginger Day" is by turning to the people it's intended to celebrate — the gingers of the world.

Redheads took to Twitter on Tuesday to respond to the "holiday." Some were perfectly happy to play along with the joke:

While this redhead was planning on hiding her hair until the "holiday" was over:

Some redheads were confused:

And some were just hoping for their kisses:

At least one person made the very important point that Kiss a Ginger Day is only fun if everyone is on board:

While the response to the holiday is lighthearted, discrimination against redheads is, unfortunately, a real thing. A 2013 article in the Telegraph outlined some stories of the abuse that redheads have faced due to their hair color, including being mocked, bullied and physically attacked. 

In 2014, a student at the University College Cork in Ireland presented a study titled "Red hair in popular culture and the relationship with anxiety and depression," which found that 60.6% of men and 47.3% of women had experienced discrimination based on their red hair color, reported the BBC.


Source: Imgur

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Anna Swartz

Anna is a staff writer for Mic covering breaking news. She can be reached at aswartz@mic.com.

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