Tinder Users Want To Show You What They Really Look Like While They're Swiping

Tinder Users Want To Show You What They Really Look Like While They're Swiping
Source: Twitter
Source: Twitter

It's only natural that when it comes to choosing dating profile pics, most of us are inclined to display images of ourselves looking our hottest while living our best lives. A viral new hashtag, however, is here to expose us all for the unkempt garden gnomes that we secretly are.

It's called #OnTinderAtTinder, meant to display the juxtaposition of how we look on the app in Valencia-filtered SmartphoneLand versus how we look IRL, while literally looking at the app.

The hashtag was started by Someecards.com late last week and has since resulted in a number of surprisingly frank side-by-side portraits of Tinderfolk being real humans. The photos underscore the stark difference between the polished sheen of a default picture and the unadulterated realness of a night spent at home eating a burrito and/or masturbating whilst swiping. 

Of course, it makes sense that single people would opt for the pics on the left versus the pics on the right. Since humans are generally horny and shallow, anyone who doesn't put their best face forward is going to miss out on a ton of possible matches and/or orgasms.

But it's also worth noting that the overly polished Tinder pics just miiiiiiight be more realistic for a first date lead-up anyway. After all, the pictures on the left just scream, "I am a v. bathed human who made myself look presentable for a romantic evening with someone I barely know." Meanwhile, the pictures on the right say something more like, "I am either alone or in the presence of someone I've been dating for at least, like, a year. LOL, what's a shower?"

In any case, it's still pretty funny to see images of the two looks right next to each other. Also funny are some of the more creatively fashioned #OnTinderAtTinder posts, which really drive the whole point home.

h/t the Guardian

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Nicolas DiDomizio

Nicolas DiDomizio is a Staff Connections Writer at Mic. Prior to Mic, he was at MTV for 3 years. He holds a masters from NYU and a bachelors from Western Connecticut State University. Contact him at nic@mic.com.

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