Jeffrey Johnson is the Empire State Building Shooter: Fifth Avenue Gunman Worked At Hazan Imports

Jeffrey Johnson is the Empire State Building shooter.

The shooter was a 53-years-old. He gunned down his ex-boss and wounded seven bystanders on the crowded sidewalks outside the Empire State Building in a Friday morning shooting spree, New York City police and witnesses said. Johnson apparently used a semi-automatic, 50 caliber weapon.

Johnson was fired on Thursday from Hazan Imports, where he was an employee for six years. He wore a business suit and carried a briefcase when he shot and killed his victim near the 33rd street entrance to the iconic Midtown New York building. The Empire State Building is home to a number of Midtown businesses.

Reports indicate that eight people were shot and one killed; witnesses on the ground were under the impression that two people were killed. ABC News was reporting that the gunfire erupted over a workplace dispute. 

The shooting occurred during the hectic morning rush hour, shortly after 9 a.m., when throngs of people shuffle to their Midtown offices. The shooter was killed by police. 

Witnesses say the gunman was firing indiscriminately. A witness, Aliyah Imam, told FOX News she was standing at a red light when the woman next to her fell to the ground after being shot in the hip. Friday morning's shooting comes on the heels of numerous public shooting in the United States this summer including the Aurora shooting and the Wisconsin shooting at a Sikh Temple. 

Though this shooting may pale in comparison in terms of the amount of victims, the event comes in the heart of America’s busiest business — and media — center. Media outlets like the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Reuters, the Associated Press, and PolicyMic all call Midtown home. Because major media outlets are located near the shooting, expect coverage to be disproportionately saturated.

See PolicyMic's LIVE coverage of the Empire Stare Building shooting here

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Chris Miles

Chris has worked for media outlets including the Associated Press and Stars and Stripes. He worked with the Clinton Foundation, the United Nations, and with the Kentucky state legislature. He holds a master's degree in political science from the University of Louisville, and a BA in journalism and political science from the University of Kentucky. He is originally from Lexington, Ky. Kentucky basketball occupies a majority of his free time.

MORE FROM

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

Kshama Sawant on why Seattle needs an independent investigation into the Charleena Lyles shooting

Seattle City Councilperson Kshama Sawant, member of Socialist Alternative party, discusses the Charleena Lyles investigation, tenant voter registration, why Hillary Clinton lost in 2016 and more.

The EPA seeks to undo clean water rule, putting 117 million Americans' water at risk

The new rule could have "long-reaching consequences for everyone living in the United States.”

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.