'Better Call Saul' Season 2 Premiere: Here's Everything We Know About the Second Season

'Better Call Saul' Season 2 Premiere: Here's Everything We Know About the Second Season

The second season of the Breaking Bad spinoff Better Call Saul is on the horizon. AMC will host the Emmy-nominated show's Monday premiere at 10 p.m. Eastern. Super fans of the series who want to see what's on deck can head to AMC's season two preview page, where the show's producers have shared photos from filming on site in Albuquerque, New Mexico. According to AMC, the show will welcome back Bob Odenkirk, who plays lawyer-in-training Jimmy McGill, and the series will boast 10 episodes. For viewing options head here.

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"Season two of of Better Call Saul gets pretty wild," said Peter Gould, a creator and executive producer of the show, in an AMC season preview. "Things get dark and things get big." Vince Gilligan, also a creator and an executive producer of the show added, "Is Saul Goodman Jimmy McGill's true nature? It remains to be seen."

"Season one, the way it ended, I mean, anything could happen," added Odenkirk in the season preview. 

Source: YouTube

The series is set six years before we meet Saul in Breaking Bad, and the plot chronicles the early development, or rather transformation, of Jimmy McGill's career. The core question during season two of the series will be how much Jimmy McGill's character can develop into Saul, and that transformation will be a slow one according to Odenkirk. 

"I think one of the things Vince showed us with Breaking Bad is that people can change, they just change incredibly slowly and they struggle and sweat through those changes," Odenkirk said in an interview with IGN. "They really need to be ground down and pressurized in order to change in a fundamental way. In the case of Breaking Bad, Walter White didn't really change, he just became more of who he was in his inner core. He began to express himself more in the real world."

"But I think in the case of Jimmy McGill, he is transforming," Odenkirk added in the interview. "But it's happening in a realistic and, I must say, somewhat painful way."