This Is What Happened When a Gay Voter Confronted Marco Rubio in New Hampshire

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Need to know the 11 words that can get Sen. Marco Rubio to run away? Try these: "Why do you want to put me back in the closet?" 

New Hampshire voter and gay man Timothy Kierstead asked Rubio just that when they came face to face at the Puritan Backroom diner early Tuesday morning, the day of the state's primary. 

"You can live any way you want," Rubio said in response. 

Kierstead is married and said that Rubio's position on gay marriage sends a clear message to gay voters: "We don't matter." 

Rubio iterated his position on the matter to the concerned voter: "No, I just believe marriage is between one man and one woman." 

In December, Rubio promised to reverse the Supreme Court ruling that legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states. 

"It is the current law," Rubio told NBC's Meet the Press. "I don't believe any case law is settled law. Any future Supreme Court can change it."

Source: YouTube

But Kierstead was not having it. "Well, that's your belief," he said. 

Rubio then told Kierstead that he could work to change the law if that's what he believed — even though gay marriage is currently legal and Rubio is working to reverse that reality. 

Eventually, Rubio exited the conversation. "I respect your view," he told Kierstead. 

"Typical politician," Kierstead said. "Walk away." 

According to the New York Times, Kierstead is a restaurant owner from Manchester and registered independent who will be voting for a Democrat. 

"They want to take my rights away as a citizen of the United States," Kierstead told the New York Times. "Love is love. People don't choose who they are going to love."

h/t the New York Times 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Mathew Rodriguez

Mathew Rodriguez is a Staff Writer at Mic. He is a queer Latino New Yorker who enjoys female rappers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Flannery O'Connor. He is a former editor at TheBody.com and he is working on a memoir.

MORE FROM

CNN retraction and undercover video feeds into pro-Trump media's "fake news" claims

The release of a secretly recorded video of a CNN producer on Tuesday has amplified criticism.

"No religion" is now Australia's most popular religious affiliation

The segment of Australia's population marking "no religion" is growing quickly.

Global ransomware hack hits infrastructure targets across Europe

Targets include Russia's biggest oil company, Ukraine's largest airport and its state power company.

France convenes youngest, most diverse Parliament in its history. Is this the future of Europe?

Thanks to Emmanuel Macron's newly formed party, the French government is more diverse than ever before.

Kremlin slams White House's warning of potential chemical attack in Syria

The U.S. and Russia continue to spar over Syria.

CNN retraction and undercover video feeds into pro-Trump media's "fake news" claims

The release of a secretly recorded video of a CNN producer on Tuesday has amplified criticism.

"No religion" is now Australia's most popular religious affiliation

The segment of Australia's population marking "no religion" is growing quickly.

Global ransomware hack hits infrastructure targets across Europe

Targets include Russia's biggest oil company, Ukraine's largest airport and its state power company.

France convenes youngest, most diverse Parliament in its history. Is this the future of Europe?

Thanks to Emmanuel Macron's newly formed party, the French government is more diverse than ever before.

Kremlin slams White House's warning of potential chemical attack in Syria

The U.S. and Russia continue to spar over Syria.