Millennials Are More Sophisticated Drinkers Than the Rest of the Country

Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Millennials are a classy bunch.

In 2015, the generation of adults ages 21 to 38 drank 42% of all wine consumed in the United States, amounting to 159.6 million cases. Wine Spectator cited a recent report from the Wine Market Council, which noted that these figures mean millennials drank more than any other generation in the country last year.

And they aren't just trading in their kegs for a box of Franzia. The study shows that in the past month, 17% of millennial wine drinkers spent over $20 on a single bottle of wine, as compared to 10% of all wine drinkers and 5% of baby boomers. 

Read More: Watch Amy Schumer Flawlessly Skewer Rape Culture With This Hilarious Parody

John Gillespie, president of the Wine Market Council, said the spike suggests wine has found a new target demographic. "Wine drinkers are beginning to sort themselves out," he said when he presented his research at the council's 11th annual research conference in January. "It's the self-identification of, 'Yeah, I'm a wine person.'"

Unless a "wine person" means a human largely composed of wine, that sounds like an understatement. 

Source: Giphy

According to the study, the average millennial drinks 3.1 glasses of wine in one sitting (or one very large glass of wine if you're Amy Schumer).

There have been countless studies on the benefits of drinking wine: Studies that say drinking a glass of red could be as effective as an hour at the gym, studies that say a drink after work could reduce your risk for heart failure and studies that say red wine lowers cholesterol. And, science aside, the elderly swear it's the secret to a long (like 107-year long) life.

Who can argue with that?

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Marie Solis

Marie is a Slay staff writer with focuses in culture and class. Her writing has appeared in Gothamist and the Awl. You can reach her at marie@mic.com.

MORE FROM

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

CNN retraction and undercover video feeds into pro-Trump media's "fake news" claims

The release of a secretly recorded video of a CNN producer on Tuesday has amplified criticism.

Lockdown lifted at Alabama military post after reports of "possible active shooter"

The Redstone Arsenal was briefly on lockdown Tuesday.

This small Ohio town might stop treating heroin overdoses to save the city money

"People will die. It's plain and simple."

Here's what New York's first official LGBTQ monument will look like

Here's our first look at New York's new monument to LGBT communities.

How will Trump's travel ban be enforced? Here's what the Supreme Court's decision really means.

The Supreme Court's order prevents most of the ban from taking effect before the case is heard, with limited exceptions.

Tick saliva could be the key to fighting a dangerous heart condition

Ticks could hold the secret to treating this heart condition.

CNN retraction and undercover video feeds into pro-Trump media's "fake news" claims

The release of a secretly recorded video of a CNN producer on Tuesday has amplified criticism.

Lockdown lifted at Alabama military post after reports of "possible active shooter"

The Redstone Arsenal was briefly on lockdown Tuesday.