'Hamilton' Musical Full Cast — Here's Who's Performing in the Acclaimed Broadway Show

'Hamilton' Musical Full Cast — Here's Who's Performing in the Acclaimed Broadway Show

On Monday night, the Hamilton cast made Grammy history. Performing the hit musical's first song, "Alexander Hamilton," creator Lin-Manuel Miranda and his fellow actors were broadcast live across the country as part of the 2016 Grammy Awards. The widely acclaimed show has consistently sold out since it opened off-Broadway a year ago; tickets are notoriously scarce, so the televised performance might be the only chance some of us get to see what Hamilton is all about.

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Miranda and his cast didn't disappoint, showing viewers exactly why they deserved the Grammy for best musical theater album they took home that night. Here's a list of the actors who helped make Hamilton the award-winning cultural phenomenon it's become a year after its premiere.

'Hamilton' creator and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda on stage.
Source: 
Charles Sykes/AP

Main Cast

Lin-Manuel Miranda — Alexander Hamilton 

Daveed Diggs — Marquis de Lafayette and Thomas Jefferson

Jonathan Groff — King George

Renée Elise Goldsberry — Angelica Schuyler

Christopher Jackson — George Washington

Jasmine Cephas Jones — Peggy Schuyler and Maria Reynolds

Leslie Odom Jr. — Aaron Burr

Okieriete Onaodowan — Hercules Mulligan and James Madison

Anthony Ramos — John Laurens and Phillip Hamilton

Phillipa Soo — Eliza Hamilton

Ensemble

Carleigh Bettiol

Ariana DeBose

Shonica Gooden

Sydney James Harcourt

Sasha Hutchings

Thayne Jasperson

Emmy Raver-Lampman

Jon Rua

Austin Smith

Seth Stewart

Betsy Struxness

Ephraim Sykes

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Claire Lampen

Claire is a staff writer at Mic who covers women's issues and reproductive rights. She is based in New York and can be reached at claire@mic.com.

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