Hillary Clinton Just Made Great Points About Systemic Racism at a Speech in Harlem

Hillary Clinton Just Made Great Points About Systemic Racism at a Speech in Harlem
Source: Getty Images
Source: Getty Images

Hillary Clinton tackled racial injustice head on in New York on Tuesday, in a speech to voters at Harlem's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. In an expansive speech on "systemic racism," Clinton addressed everything from mass incarceration to supporting black entrepreneurs and job creation to segregation in the American educational system and beyond.

Clinton then directed voters to her website, where she published a cohesive plan to address systemic racism. First, the candidate states, she'll work to "dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline" by providing $2 billion to support school reform and push states to direct educational funding to "implement social and emotional support interventions."


Additionally, considering that 1.5 million black men are incarcerated and that Native Americans are generally incarcerated at a rate 38% higher than the national average, Clinton's site says that she will cut mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent drug offenses in half and prioritize treatment and rehabilitation over incarceration.

The speech makes Clinton's plans to address racial injustice clear. How her fellow candidates will respond remains to be seen.

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Julie Zeilinger

Julie Zeilinger is a staff writer at Mic as well as the founder and editor of The FBomb (thefbomb.org), a feminist blog partnered with the Women’s Media Center. She is also the author of "A Little F’d Up: Why Feminism Is Not A Dirty Word" and "College 101: A Girl’s Guide to Freshman Year."

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