This Dolphin Died After People on an Argentine Beach Passed it Around to Take Selfies

Source: Facebook
Source: Facebook

Beachgoers at Santa Teresita, Argentina, plucked a young dolphin from the ocean to pass it around and take selfies when the animal apparently overheated and died.

The dolphin was still being passed around for photo opportunities after its death, before it was unceremoniously dumped in the sand, according to Sky News

Hernan Coria, who was present for the incident, documented the event and shared it on Facebook on Feb. 10, producing impassioned responses from angry users around the world. The posts have since been removed.

Read more: Japanese Ship to Kill 333 Whales Per Year for "Research" — And the World Is Not Happy

The dolphin was a La Plata, or Franciscana, a species classified as "vulnerable" by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and is on the organization's Red List of Threatened Species. The IUCN estimates there could be as few as 40,000 left in the world, and are some of the most rare in the waters of South America.

"The Franciscana, like other species, cannot remain for much time outside of the water, it has thick fatty skin which gives it heat and means that taking it out of the water rapidly causes it to dehydrate and die," the Argentine Wildlife Foundation said in a statement, according to Sky News.

"This occasion serves to inform the public about the urgent necessity to return these dolphins to the sea as soon as possible if they find them on the shore," the foundation added. "It is fundamental that people help to rescue these animals, because every Franciscana counts now." 

It's not the first time reckless selfie-taking has resulted in death. In 2014, a Polish couple visiting Portugal fell and died after taking selfies on a cliff — and that was just one of a similar series of deadly incidents. 

And then there are the selfies simply taken in poor taste. Think NBA player Danny Green who took an irreverent snap of himself at Berlin's Holocaust memorial museum; or the numerous passersby who snapped a selfie in front of a 2015 gas fire explosion in New York City that killed two, and were later shamed on a New York Post cover. 

Think before you selfie, people.

Feb. 18, 2015, 5:03 p.m. Eastern: This post has been updated.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Natasha Noman

Natasha is a News Staff Writer covering global affairs. She previously reported on regional affairs from Pakistan. Natasha is based in New York and can be reached at natasha@mic.com.

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.