How to Cleanse Your Body of Toxins? It's Easy — Don't Drink Alcohol

How to Cleanse Your Body of Toxins? It's Easy — Don't Drink Alcohol

Sometimes the best piece of advice can be the most simple. The best way to cleanse the body is to possess a healthy body; a healthy (keyword: healthy) liver, healthy kidneys and healthy intestines all constantly work to detoxify the body without the help of any expensive juices. But alcohol may prevent the body's natural cleansing process. 

Read more: These "Detox" Masks May Actually Contain a Shit Ton of Lead, Says FDA

Alcohol, specifically brownish liquors like rum and whisky, contain congeners, frequently toxic substances that occur naturally due to the fermentation process, or are added during the production of the liquors, which hamper cell function, according to Health.com. The detrimental effects of alcohol place added stress on the liver, kidneys and the intestines. 

The alternative and holistic health site Native Remedies states that alcohol can be harmful, particularly on the organs that cleanse the body: "The use of alcohol and drugs whether it is great or small, affects the body. Two organs, along with many others that can become affected by alcohol and drug use, are the liver and kidneys. Depending on how long and how much someone has been abusing alcohol and drugs, the more toxins the body will build up in these organs." 

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism states that consuming too much liquor, whether all at once or over time, can have detrimental effects on the body. The liver, for instance, can suffer permanent damage as a result of heavy drinking. 

Instead of drinking alcohol, experts encourage dieters to drink water or tea instead. "Not only is tea full of antioxidants, it hydrates you (especially if it's herbal) and fills you up," research psychologist and wellness coach Ashley Karr told Shape. "This means you will be less likely to overeat or eat the wrong things!" 

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Philip Lewis

Philip Lewis is a programming editor at Mic. He was previously an editorial fellow for 'The Huffington Post'. He can be reached at plewis@mic.com

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