These 5 "Health" Products and Procedures Are Actually Scams and Possibly Dangerous

These 5 "Health" Products and Procedures Are Actually Scams and Possibly Dangerous

Miracles cannot be purchased in a drug store. And yet, so many over-the-counter products claim miraculous results — according to the Food and Drug Administration, the products that most frequently advertise themselves as such are weight-loss tools. However, anything that purports to work like magic probably doesn't work at all. 

Read more: Why Your Gluten-Free Diet Is (Probably) Bullshit

Here are five of the most over-hyped, over-used "health" products the world should stop wasting money on. Not only are they ineffective in the long term, but many have proved dangerous in the past.

Master Cleanse

Please don't.
Source: Seth Wenig/AP

The thing about being a human with a body is that you need to feed said body in order to keep it functioning. A concoction of lemon juice, maple syrup, cayenne pepper and laxatives does not constitute a meal, not even a snack. That's why the Master Cleanse is more than just bullshit; it can be legitimately dangerous, often leaving cleansers dehydrated with weakened immune systems, while also putting stress on the heart.

Most people will lose weight whilst Master Cleansing — because they won't have eaten anything for 10 days — but that's little more than an illusion. What they're losing is water weight; the pounds are likely to return once food consumption resumes, making the Master Cleanse an exercise in futility and a straight-up scam.

Cellulite cream

Approximately 70% of women can understand the frustration with impossible-to-banish cellulite — the cottage-cheese effect that crops up on skin, thanks to fat underneath — inspires. Unfortunately for everyone, doctors say creams don't cure cellulite; at best, they reduce its appearance for fleeting stretches. 

Some products are certainly better than others — those may include retinol, caffeine and alpha hydroxy acids — but they won't melt the fat at the root of the problem. According to the Mayo Clinic, exercise and muscle strengthening is the best bet for ridding oneself of cellulite.

Diet Pills

Just some weight loss pills, the manufacturers of which were sued for their false claims.
Source: David McNew/Getty Images

If it sounds too good to be true — and for many, losing 15 pounds with zero effort certainly would — it probably is. As such, it should surprise no one to learn that many diet pills are scams. Some have even been fatal

Things like green coffee bean extract and raspberry ketones would be better left on the shelves. Even if their purported primary ingredients are eventually found to promote weight loss, ingredients in supplements are, in many instances, questionable.

"Don't take weight-loss supplements," Consumer Reports said in 2015. "They're most likely unregulated, they probably don't work, and they could harm you."

Miracle teas

A photo posted by (@) on

Detox tea won't leave users with a Kylie Jenner body. As with the Master Cleanse, a detox tea diet may help consumers shed water weight, according to Health, but that's a temporary solution to weight loss. Plus, frequently used detox tea ingredients like senna and guarana can lead to cramping, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, agitation and elevated heart rate among other things, as Health reported. 

And to be clear, a celeb posing with a product for an Instagram post is not akin to that celeb swearing by said product. Often, all it means is that the person is getting an impressive check to link their face and/or physique to a brand. Jenner probably loses weight through a strictly controlled diet and exercise plan.

Finally, we have vital organs to do the bodily detoxifying for us. Don't waste money on scam tea.

Icy Hot Weight Loss Wrap

Saran Wrap weight loss got us like
Source: Giphy

Okay. Slathering oneself in Icy Hot — the pain relief cream that goes on cool and warms on the skin — and then mummifying oneself in saran wrap for a few uncomfortable hours may leave one looking slimmer. Doctors, however, seem to agree that the weight lost will, again, just be water weight. People who try this will invariably regain the pounds they sweat off whilst wrapped in plastic. It's a mirage. No need to waste time on this one.

Bottom line: The best way to lose weight is the one medical professionals have been recommending since forever — healthy diet and exercise. Period, end of listicle.