Latino Voters Had a Big Hand in Hillary Clinton's Super Tuesday Victory in Texas

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It was a súper Tuesday for Hillary Clinton.

Aside from winning primaries in seven states' primaries on Super Tuesday, Clinton's camp trounced Sanders by a 70-30 margin when it came to Texas Latinos, BuzzFeed reported.

Read more: Hillary Clinton's Super Tuesday Wins Are the Perfect Start to Women's History Month

"It's not surprising," Julián Castro, secretary of Housing and Urban Development, told BuzzFeed. "Hillary Clinton has had strong support in the Latino community in Texas and throughout the country for a very long time, and tonight's results in Texas and her strong support from Latinos are one more affirmation that she appeals to diverse communities. It says a lot about her ability to win in November."Hillary Clinton has had strong support in the Latino community in Texas and throughout the country for a very long time, and tonight's results in Texas and her strong support from Latinos are one more affirmation that she appeals to diverse communities. It says a lot about her ability to win in November."

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Immigration has been a cornerstone of Clinton's platform, and she said believes in a path to citizenship. That makes a difference in an electorate like Texas, where there are 1.7 million undocumented immigrants. Exit polls asked about a number of issues, but not immigration. 

However, it has not always been rosy for the former first lady and Secretary of State when it comes to the United States' Latino population. Clinton used the term "illegal immigrants" rather than "undocumented immigrants" as recently as November. However, she later apologized and has since called out former Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush for his use of the term "presidential candidate Jeb Bush for his use of the term "anchor babies" to describe the children of undocumented immigrants. 

In December, Clinton was called out for "Hispandering," or pandering to the Hispanic community when an article on her website listed the ways that she is just like people's abuelas, or grandmothers. In turn, the article sparked the hashtag #NotMyAbuela.  

Currently, half of Latinos eligible to vote are millennials, a demographic notorious for two things: a love of Sanders and lower voter turnout than other age groups. 

For now though, Latinos seem to be flocking to Clinton, adding another important voting bloc to her current coalition, which includes women, black voters and older voters.