Donald Trump Super Tuesday 2016 Results: How the Candidate Performed In Each State

Donald Trump Super Tuesday 2016 Results: How the Candidate Performed In Each State

The Super Tuesday results are in, and they have quite a few people across the country considering a new home in Canada. As expected, Republican frontrunner Donald Trump solidified his lead in the race for GOP presidential nominee, winning seven of the 11 states that held primaries on March 1. 

"A lot of people smugly said when we get down to reality, he is not going to be the nominee because in the end people aren't going to vote for him," Newt Gingrich, once the House speaker and a presidential candidate, said of Trump. "Well, guess what — he's almost certainly going to be the nominee."

Read more: Super Tuesday 2016 Results: Here's Who Won in Every State

This comes despite his recent refusal to disavow the Klu Klux Klan or former Grand Wizard David Duke, and despite his embrace of fascist leader Benito Mussolini's strong, some might say questionable rhetoric. The possibility of a Trump 2016 candidacy is looking more and more concrete, with Florida's March 15 contest among the businessman's largest campaign goals, as he explained in his Super Tuesday press conference

Trump gives a press conference on Super Tuesday; Chris Christie wrestles with the consequences of his actions in the background.
Source: 
Andrew Harnik/AP

According to the New York Times, the state-by-state percentage of voters who want to "Make America Great Again" shakes out like this:

Alabama — 43%

Arkansas — 33%

Georgia — 39% 

Massachusetts — 49%

Tennessee — 39%

Vermont — 33%

Virginia — 35% 


As the Times reported, that leaves Trump with a total of 316 delegates to the Republican National Convention, against Ted Cruz's 226, Marco Rubio's 106, John Kasich's 25 and Ben Carson's eight. A candidate needs 1,237 delegates to win the party's nomination. 

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Claire Lampen

Claire is a staff writer at Mic who covers women's issues and reproductive rights. She is based in New York and can be reached at claire@mic.com.

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